Sunday, March 27, 2016

Ten things I learned in Scotland and England...

We're home at last!  And boy, did we have ourselves an eventful trip!  Since we were gone for almost two weeks and a lot happened, I'm going to do something now that I usually do after I write up my vacations.  I'm going to type a list of ten things I learned on our most recent trip to Scotland and England.  I'm doing that now because I know some readers would prefer a quick and dirty recap and I have a feeling this trip report will consist of many moving parts.

Even though Bill and I have been to England and Scotland before-- and I even lived in England at one time in my life-- we always learn new things when we travel.  And this trip taught us some truly surprising things.  We spent the first week on a whisky cruise on Hebridean Princess in Scotland.  The cruise focused on visits to whisky distilleries, though we also had a few non boozy excursions.   Next, we went to England and caught Avenue Q in Stoke on Trent and visited my old stomping grounds near Mildenhall Air Force Base.  We had an unforgettable trip that I'm itching to share with everyone.  So here goes.

10.  Apparently, Scotland has its own money.  Yes, it's true.  Even though Scotland voted to remain a member of the United Kingdom, more than once, we ran into problems when we tried to use Scottish bills in England.  In fact, this morning Bill tried to pay a fee at the Norwich airport with a Scottish note and it didn't work!  He quipped that he'd have to find a "non-Confederate" note.  But, just so you know, Scottish money is legal tender in England.  It's just that they don't seem to see it that much or something.

9.  Driving on the left isn't so hard.  Bill was very nervous about trying to drive in the United Kingdom.  As it turned out, it wasn't bad at all.  We had visions of Clark Griswold style driving mishaps when we first considered driving in the UK, but Bill did just fine!  And now he has a new skill to brag about.


We did not have any encounters with Eric Idle in England.

8.  There are many roundabouts in England... more than there are in Germany.  Fortunately, none we encountered were as bad as this one.


I heard there's a really scary one in Swindon, though...

7.  My old house in England still looks the same as it did in 1978.  We drove to Mildenhall Air Force Base, which is where my dad did his very last assignment as an Air Force lieutenant colonel.  I was almost six years old when we left England, so it's where my earliest memories come from.  Very surprisingly, it was easy to find the housing area where I once lived and the house my family lived in.  I sent a photo to my much older sisters who confirmed that I got it right.

6.  But Mildenhall itself is very different...  There are some things around the base that are the same, but I was very shocked by how many more people are there and how much housing there is.  Also, I was surprised by the traffic!  Forty years ago, Mildenhall was surrounded by small towns and lots of open space.  Not so, now.  

5.  The story my mom told me about the street named after my dad was not bullshit...  And I will write an updated post about that eventually to explain everything.  Suffice to say, I found the street supposedly named after my dad and having seen it and noted where it is, I believe my mom's tale was truthful.

4.  It's not a good idea to drink from the same cup, especially among strangers.   Even though I am supposedly "overeducated" with master's degrees in social work and public health, sometimes I still do really stupid things.  I did something dumb on this trip and ended up in deep doo doo.  On a related note, toilets in the UK are kind of weird.  It takes practice to be able to flush them effectively.

3.  Scotland is as beautiful in March as it is in November...  I managed to get some gorgeous photos on this trip.  I also got lots of video, which I hope to turn into a new YouTube film.  I will be busy for the next couple of weeks!

2.  Haggis can be delicious!  I don't remember liking haggis that much the first time I tried it, but this last time, I thought it was very tasty.  That was quite a surprise for me.  I don't know if it was because of the chefs on Hebridean Princess or just because of my Scottish ancestry.  ;-)  Having written that, I think haggis will be one of those dishes I sample only when I am in Scotland among people in kilts and surrounded by whisky.

1.  A cruise on Hebridean Princess is a marvelous, yet expensive way to see Scotland.  Okay, I knew that already, but it was reaffirmed on this last trip, even though I got hit with a stomach bug on the last day.  I will explain more about what happened as I blog... or, for those who have strong stomachs and high curiosity, there is a rather graphic account on my main blog.  I promise to keep the account on this blog more or less PG rated.


Anchors Aweigh!

Now, on with my trip report!

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